*Updated on 8 Jan, 2014*

MTHFR, along with other gene mutations and heredity factors, can present special problems in pregnancy and reproduction. This is not to say that if you have these mutations you should be alarmed; many women with MTHFR mutations have multiple successful pregnancies before they even find out that they have these mutations. But if you’re already aware of your genetic status, it would be highly beneficial to take special precautions to ensure a successful pregnancy and healthy baby (and I think testing for every person is important). I myself am currently dealing with these issues. After an early miscarriage at the start of the year and prior difficulty conceiving, my husband and I have been hard at work to uncover as many health issues as we could over the last nine months and treat them before trying again. So with this post, I will be sharing most of what I’ve learned with you.

pregnant

What problems can MTHFR cause?

MTHFR gene mutations can create many of the same problems in pregnant women as they can in non-pregnant people. Pregnancy does, however, amplify some of the risks and effects.

In the mother

Pregnant women are more prone to blood clots, for example, which are generally a risk when a person has elevated homocysteine. As we know, excess homocysteine is a common side effect of MTHFR mutations. High homocysteine can also cause pre-eclampsia and miscarriage, which I’ll discuss a little more in the next section. It is important to note also that, according to leading MTHFR researcher Dr. Ben Lynch, it isn’t enough to just look at homocysteine levels when dealing with pregnancy complications and loss. Sometimes a patient may not have an elevated serum homocysteine level, but still may have issues due to MTHFR. MTHFR mutations must be identified and addressed in order to achieve optimal results. Untreated MTHFR also puts women at a higher risk of postpartum depression.

In the father

A father’s folate status and diet have been found to be important in preventing birth defects and other diseases in offspring. So be sure he’s methylating adequately and getting the proper nutrition prior to conception.

In the baby

It is important to remember that MTHFR gene mutations are inherited. Therefore, depending on what mutations are present in the mother and father, the fetus is likely to inherit MTHFR in some form. The baby can inherit problems in its own DNA, which present symptoms, and can also suffer from the nutritional deficiencies of the mother that are caused by her gene mutations. The most common problem is the risk of neural tube defects because of the mother’s inability to convert folic acid into l-methylfolate. Before I was aware of MTHFR, I was ingesting copious amounts of folic acid. This just blocks a person with MTHFR’s ability to absorb and assimilate natural folate and methylfolate. It is a major failing of current widespread prenatal advice that more women are not aware of the problems of folic acid for so many members of the population. A lack of folate and/or B12 can cause everything from spina bifida to anencephaly to Down’s Syndrome. Elevated homocysteine can cause low birth weight and premature birth.

There are also additional risks once the baby is born, which makes testing for methylation gene defects important. MTHFR has been linked to congenital heart disease, autism, ADD/ADHD and a host of other illnesses. As Dr. Kendal Stewart reminds us, it’s possible to use epigenetics to bypass the harmful effects of these mutations in your child, but only if you know which mutations he has. Ensuring proper methylation in a baby will prevent impaired immunity and virus and heavy metal accumulation from birth. This is an essential component to preventing autism and other serious health conditions.

It is especially important to avoid folic acid, which is the synthetic form of folate, if you and/or your baby has MTHFR gene mutations. This does not mean that you shouldn’t consume folate. Synthetic folic acid cannot be converted properly to methylfolate and blocks the folate receptors in people with MTHFR. Try taking methylfolate instead, as recommended by Dr. Ben Lynch in this article.

What if I’m having trouble becoming or staying pregnant?

MTHFR has proven to be a common factor in both infertility and pregnancy loss. Unfortunately, many of these miscarriages are recurring and this can be due to other genetic factors influencing repeat pregnancy loss (RPL). As Dr. Lynch points out, it will be important to test both the father and the mother in these cases.

Egg quality can also be an issue for women with MTHFR. This is not to say that MTHFR has a direct negative impact on egg quality, but people with untreated MTHFR often have other chronic conditions that affect them. These things can cause problems with egg quality (I will cover most of them in my ‘Things That Plague Us’ series, which has just begun). New research has determined that the father’s MTHFR status can also play a role. MTHFR has an effect on fetal viability and can also be a contributing factor to stillbirth. So if you are suffering from infertility or RPL, it is important to be tested for MTHFR and other genetic problems, and be sure that you are tested correctly. As Dr. Lynch recommends, a test for plasma S-adenosylhomocysteine may be necessary. In the last section I’ll talk more about some other things to test for and be aware of.

What steps can I take to compensate for MTHFR enzyme deficiency?

The good news is that there is a lot that you can do to ensure healthy outcomes for you and your family when trying to become pregnant. The first thing will be to ensure that you and your partner are methylating properly and receiving the correct nutritional support.

Prenatal vitamins

I shudder every time I read about a woman being prescribed Folgard for her MTHFR mutations. That recommendation is based on outdated information, which would indicate that high-dose folic acid is the appropriate way to treat MTHFR gene mutations. Folic acid and the non-methylated forms of the B vitamins provided by this supplement are not appropriate for anyone with MTHFR gene defects. Instead, you can find several other formulas that will provide the support you need (assuming you don’t have other genetic mutations that prevent your tolerance of methylated vitamins – I’ve discussed this elsewhere on the blog).

I’ve tried three of these prenatal vitamins myself. The first was Neevo, which I didn’t like for several reasons. First, it’s very expensive if your insurance doesn’t cover it (and many don’t because it is considered a nutritional supplement). Second, Neevo is not a complete prenatal, which means that you would have to supplement other vitamins to get the proper nutritional support. With the high cost of Neevo that didn’t cut it for me. I expect to get vitamin A, zinc, manganese and more calcium in my prenatal, at the very least. Finally, you know I’m into the all-natural, so I see no need to have artificial colors added to any of my vitamins, which Neevo has. I also don’t want soy. Next.

I took Thorne’s Basic Prenatal for a couple of months but that didn’t do it for me either. I wasn’t happy with the vitamin K1 (I still haven’t figured out whether K1 would be contraindicated for those of us with MTHFR and, hence, a higher risk of clotting) and chromium picolinate. Some women also cannot tolerate the amount of iron (45 mg) in Thorne’s Basic Prenatal either. Luckily, Dr. Lynch has formulated two awesome new prenatal formulas in his Seeking Health line, which I have been taking for the last month and a half with no issues so far. The Optimal Prenatal formulas contain both folinic acid (not the same as folic acid) and methylfolate, two forms of active B12, two forms of vitamin A (the second to assist those with the BCMO1 snp), all the other required and active forms of B vitamins, Betaine HCl and additional herbs and nutrients. Note that there is no iron or fish oil in this formula so if you need those (and a good fish oil is highly recommended), you’ll want to add an additional supplement. The Seeking Health prenatal supplements come in both capsule and powder form.

To Lovenox or not?

This is the question on the lips of many a MTHFR sufferer. Do I need daily injections of a blood thinner during my pregnancy? From everything I’ve read the answer seems to be that if you have homozygous mutations: possibly; if you have RPL: probably; if you have MTHFR mutations plus other diagnosed thrombotic issues: definitely.

I saw my maternal fetal medicine (MFM) specialist several weeks ago to discuss these matters and to review the results of some thrombotic risk tests that my MTHFR doctor had ordered. I was tested for a number of thrombotic activities and came up with only the MTHFR and very slightly elevated anticardiolipin IgM antibodies. Based on this and my other fertility issues, both the MFM and my new reproductive endocrinologist have agreed that I should proceed with only baby aspirin and progesterone supplements in the luteal phase. I couldn’t seem to get anyone to test for anything further and at the moment I’m trying to just accept the good news and not worry too much about what they might be missing. There are many different tests that a woman facing infertility and miscarriage would want to have performed, which are not within the scope of this blog post to discuss (check out the book Is Your Body Baby Friendly by Dr. Alan Beer for starters). For me, it’s just the one miscarriage and no other known thrombotic issues (fingers crossed) and we’ll see what happens next.

But many women with MTHFR do need additional medication such as Lovenox to carry to term and it’s alarming that so many doctors refuse to prescribe it. A few physicians, such as Dr. Stephen Wells and Dr. Alexander Kofinas have this treatment in their MTHFR protocols. Dr. Kofinas explains his reasoning in this paper, Why Low Molecular Weight Heparin Prevents Most Severe Pregnancy Complications. Initial scientific research for homozygous C677T cases supports this opinion. Dr. Lynch explores this subject more on his website as well. In the next section I’ll discuss some additional situations where you might want to find a doctor who is willing to explore this preventative treatment with you.

What else should I be aware of and thinking about?

I’ve tried to keep this post centered on the special circumstances surrounding MTHFR parents, however, I want to remind everyone of the fundamentals that one would find in even the most elementary prenatal books. Sometimes we get so caught up with all the MTHFR stuff we have to think about that we can forget about the basics!

First of all, protecting yourself against foodborne illness is important because pregnant women and their fetuses are at higher risk due to weakened immune systems. Eat a well-balanced diet and stay well-hydrated. Avoid eating fish that are high in mercury, such as shark, swordfish or tuna. Don’t use alcohol, drugs or tobacco and avoid secondhand smoke. Review your prescription and over the counter medications and herbal formulas for safe use during pregnancy (or use at all). Avoid environmental pollutants and limit the amount of stress in your life. These are just a few of the most common tips for all pregnant women.

Other genetic mutations

Those of you who have been exploring your genome in more detail will probably be aware of the potential problems you could encounter during pregnancy. But if you’re only focused on methylation defects at the moment, there are some single mutations or gene families that you may want to look into, particularly if you’re having problems with RPL.

Prothrombin gene mutations can act alone or with MTHFR to increase the risk of blood clots. As discussed in earlier sections, these can cause infertility, miscarriage or serious health complications for you and your unborn baby. A common mutation is Factor V Leiden, which can cause deep venous thrombosis, pre-eclampsia, placental lesions, miscarriage and other obstetric complications, with the risks increased 80-fold for those patients who are homozygous. Lovenox may be required in these situations.

Another commonly run panel detects cystic fibrosis allele mutations as many people are silent carriers of this gene. There are, of course, many others, but too many to name.

Thyroid function

As many of us with MTHFR also suffer from thyroid problems, you’re well-advised to have a basic thyroid panel run at least a few months before you try to conceive. Tests for Free T3, Free T4, TSH and antibodies are commonly run by general practitioners and endocrinologists if you ask for them. Interpreting them correctly and getting adequate treatment may be another battle, but it would be wise to correct any thyroid dysfunction prior to becoming pregnant. Pregnancy presents special challenges for thyroid patients and a lack of thyroid hormone in the mother during pregnancy can have serious implications for babies.

Making a birth plan

Don’t leave home without it. Having a plan will prepare you for all sorts of encounters you will have at the hospital and will ensure that your wishes are considered and followed prior to entering the chaos of labor and delivery. There are all sorts of things to consider, from whether you want drugs like Pitocin to be administered, to when the umbilical cord should be cut to whether you will allow vaccines and other substances to be administered to your newborn. Get together with your doctor and lawyer and ensure that you’ve drafted a legal document and know the procedures to safeguard that it’s followed. For more information on this, you can visit Childbirth.org or do a simple search online for a variety of websites that explain this in more detail.

Other tips

I have collected these from Dr. David Berger and Dr. Dietrich Klinghardt. You will (and should) find further details and additional tips via their respective links as these are both excellent articles. The items here will help to prevent miscarriage, autism and other adverse health conditions, and are generally advised for overall health in people of all ages.

    • Eliminate toxins and allergens. A large quantity of a mother’s toxic burden is passed onto her fetus through the placenta. If you can, detox before you get pregnant.
    • Avoid electromagnetic radiation, especially in your home and where you sleep. This can come from all electrical appliances, especially mobile phones, cordless phones, laptops, wifi devices and computers.
    • Have nutritional testing done before conception along with a celiac panel, a test for opioid peptides from gluten and casein, and igE and igG antibody testing. The mother should avoid foods that she is allergic to.
    • Have mercury amalgam fillings removed prior to conception (only by a dentist who knows how, see articles) and do not have these types of fillings inserted again.
    • Ensure adequate vitamin D, folate, calcium and iron levels.
    • Be vigilant about any infections you may have that could be causing miscarriage or infertility. I talked a little about this in my post on autoimmune disorders.

What are you doing to plan for pregnancy?

Disclosure: I am an affiliate of Seeking Health and will receive a small commission from the proceeds of any sale made via the links in the prenatal supplement section of this post. Be assured that any income goes to maintaining the free information I provide on this website. I use these supplements myself.

Seeking Health - Optimal Prenatal - 240 Vegetarian Capsules

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180 thoughts on “Preparing For Pregnancy With MTHFR Mutations

  1. kristen

    lovenox is not the recommendation anymore for pregnant women who have not had a blood clot. i want people to also be aware that it is a strong drug that can cause severe problems in some people such as a dangerous condition of very low platelets from the immune system attacks the drug along with plateletes. i tried it but could not handle the toxic cocktail and have decided to use garlic, ginger, low dose aspirin, and fish oil as blood thinners. please know that drugs are not always the answer. i have homogeneois a1289 and factor five and had two miscarraiges and one healthy baby without anything. this time i use methy b vitamins as well.

    Reply

  2. Kevin Tarrant

    As an anesthesiologist I would advise avoiding using nitrous oxide for labor pain.
    Nitrous causes a rise in homocysteine. It has been fatal fo some homozygous children

    Reply

  3. Pingback: What is MTHFR and How to Treat it Naturally - Holistic Health Herbalist

  4. Julie

    Do you have any information regarding MTHFR miscarriages and being treated with Methergine? Do MTHFR patients respond without side affects of this drug?

    Reply

    1. Rmj

      Methergine just helps with the bleeding associated with miscarriage and does not treat or prevent a miscarriage. I have two mutations for MTHFR and did well on it.

      Reply

  5. Mariel

    I am compound heterozygous. Was diagnosed 3 weeks before becoming pregnant and so thankfully was already on methylated folate and high quantities of other methylated B vitamins. I finally have an AMAZING functional medicine doctor in Columbia Maryland who diagnosed me correctly, treated me immediately and I saw 100% improvement in mood and energy within 3 days. Within a month my homocysteine went from 23 to 10.4 and has now stabilized at 5! I am 21 weeks pregnant and my baby is healthy. No neural tube defects or other obvious physiological issues.

    I thought it might be helpful to post what my doctor put me on for a healthy pregnancy- and what he recommends to ANY MTHFR pregnant mother.

    Everyday:
    I am taking a food based prenatal with folate, not folic acid, 800mcgs.
    Methylated B complex with 400-800 Mcgs of 5-mthf
    Perque B-12 (important! He said the methylfolate isn’t metabolized properly without this specific B12. It’s not methylcobalmin. It’s hydroxocobalmin, which is more easily assimilated than methyl.
    Separate 5-MTHF 800 McG
    AND
    Sun Chlorella!! He said take 2,000 mgs chlorella every day to bind toxins and remove them. Absolutely necessary he said and helps with blood thinning. This is counterintuitive because chlorella has vitamin K- but I trust the man and I’ve got a healthy fetus to prove it so far.
    2.5 mgs low-dose naltrexone for inflammation and immune regulation. Research it! It’s helped me tremendously. Anxiety, depression gone. Never get sick even when everyone I know is sick, including hubby. Had chronic stiffness and pain in joints which is gone. So important to control our inflammation ladies!

    He said as long as I’m taking these supplements not to worry about blood clotting or taking blood thinners/baby aspirin. Obviously some women will need these things! And it’s case-specific. But so far it has worked for me. That’s all I know.

    I am hoping and praying my baby doesn’t have issues on the spectrum when she is older and I’m working hard to do everything I can now. Good luck to all of you ladies!!!

    Reply

    1. Bela

      Hi Mariel, thank you for sharing, It is very helpful! Can you please share what brands you use for each supplement that you take, including the prenatal food based vitamins?

      Reply

    2. Nikki

      Yes, please share the brands if that’s ok. I have very limited time to research all this and am already pregnant. Any help would be appreciated! And I also would appreciate the name of the doctor in Columbia, MD!

      Reply

      1. Mariel

        So sorry I just saw the notifications for these replies!

        I take:
        Garden of Life mykind prenatal once daily from Whole Foods 1/day
        Integrative Therapeutics active b complex 1-2/day
        Life extension optimized folate 1/day
        Perque activated b-12 guard 1/day
        Sun chlorella 2,000 mgs/day

        I also take vitamin d, ionized magnesium, a prenatal probiotic, prenatal DHA, and food based iron every day.

        My doctor is Dr. Mark Sivieri. He is very difficult to get an appointment with. He is booked solid 6 months in advance, but totally worth the wait. He saved my life. I was suffering from lifelong major depression and anxiety before finally being diagnosed and treated for my methylation issues. Getting pregnant was the wonderful bonus I got for being happy for the first time in my life and finally feeling balanced emotionally and physically.

        UPDATE:
        I am now 35 weeks pregnant with no apparent health problems.
        However, my functional medicine doctor did find that my thyroid was low around 16 weeks and prescribed Liothyronine for me.

        (For anyone still struggling with miscarriage, based on my experience and what my doctor says, I would suggest getting thyroid checked! And taking chlorella.

        However, the thing that helped me the most was the LOW DOSE Naltrexone. Please research it.) is a miracle fertility booster and good for every kind of autoimmune, mood, and inflammation disorder. I got pregnant after 3 weeks on the regime I mentioned above.

        Reply

  6. Janna Quayle

    Hi, I have homozygous MTHFR C677T and have been taking the Seeking Health Optimal Prenatal with the methylfolate along with fish oil for over a year now and I am currently experiencing my 3rd miscarriage in a row over the past year. They all ended around 6-7 weeks. I feel like I am doing everything I can except I am unable to take aspirin or any NSAID’s due to stomach lining issues. Is there anything natural that I can take that will thin my blood? Should I insist my OB prescribe Lovenox?

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      So sorry for your losses, Janna. Unfortunately it’s impossible for anyone to be able to make a diagnosis over the internet – many things could be going on. Have you enlisted the help of a RE or maternal fetal medicine doctor? What about your partner (MTHFR mutations affect dads too). I always recommend seeking out a functional medicine doctor – there could be other issues you aren’t aware of. Wishing you luck on your journey…

      Reply

  7. Jennifer

    Andrea, I just wanted to thank you for this posting. In January of 2016, I found out I was heterzygous for both the MTHFR C677T and A1298C variants. I also have a personal history of APS and prenatal stroke (among other things). This post gave me the direction I needed to conceive because I wasn’t getting any info from my doctors on this matter. After researching supplements based on your information, I started taking Homocysteine Supreme by Design for Health and Best Nest Prenatal. My homocysteine went from 17.4 umol/L in January 2016 to 3.2 umol/L February 2017! I found a naturopath who tested my thyroid and found out I was hypothyroid. She put me on liothyronine and my thyroid balanced out. I am now 15 weeks pregnant with my little girl and everything looks great! I am still taking those supplements, baby aspirin and have been taking Lovenox injections now that I am pregnant. Thank you for the wonderful info. I do not know if I would be expecting right now had I not found your website.

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Thank you for sharing your journey here, Jennifer and congrats!! I LOVE hearing about success stories like yours!!

      Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      I think in Washington state but as far as I know he doesn’t see patients anymore; he has dedicated himself to educating doctors

      Reply

  8. Julie

    Hello. I tested positive for MTHFR mutation (heterozygous) after having very high plasma folate levels (I was taking a prenatal vitamin with folic acid). I have since switched to a vitamin with methylfolate and have been making a big effort to avoid fortified/processed foods. I was retested 2 months later and my plasma folate is still very high. Shouldn’t it have gone down by now?? Should I wait for it to go down before trying to conceive?
    Thanks!!

    Reply

  9. Christina

    This was very interesting to read. Before having children I had a DVT and was diagnosed with FVL and unbeknownst to me MTHRF as well. I took low doses of blood thinners and went on to have 4 children and then at the end of 2015 while about 7 weeks pregnant with my 5th child I developed another DVT. It wasn’t until post-Patrum this fall that I discovered the MTHFR diagnosis again. I took folic acid with this child regularly and while trying to conceive. He was born with a slight lip and tongue tie as well as an irregular heartbeat. It will be very interesting to see as he grows older if he (and my other children) have any lasting symptoms.

    Reply

  10. T*

    Hello Andrea,

    yesterday I found out I am compound heterozygote MTHFR. I have already had 3 misscarriages. I would like to know if OPTIMAL PRENATAL is appropriate for me, since it contains folinic acid and methylfolate? Do we, with compound heterozygote MTHFR can converse folinic acid? I started to take quatrefolic 1000mcg per day and after few days I felt anxiety – I am thinking that means I took too much? Pls, help me by answering.

    Thank you in advance!!

    T*

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Folinic and folic are not the same…yes that could be too much quatrefolic but unfortunately, not being a doctor I can’t tell you what is right or wrong for you

      Reply

      1. T*

        Thank you for your answer. OK, let me put it this way. You are also compound heterozygote MTHFR. You were taking optimal prenatal, 8cps daily? Were you taking any aspirin as well?

        Thanks,

        T*

        Reply

  11. Alexa

    Hi Andrea, you have a really good blog.

    After 3 early miscarriages in a row, I had all my tests done only to find out that I am homozygous for C667T. Not only that, but a TEG (Thromboelastogram) blood test also showed that my body cannot break down blood clots at the rate that is considered “normal”. So now we are able to link the MTHFR to the blood clotting issue and the early miscarriages.

    Now, I am seeing a specialist from St. Mary’s hospital for plan of action for my future pregnancies. Just so we know St.Mary’s runs the largest recurrent miscarriage clinic in Europe and have the largest success rates in the UK.

    So I wanted to share with you that I have been prescribed 5mg of Folic Acid daily. Now, we have a huge debate over folic acid vs the other form. And I did raise this with the doctor. He then told me that there is a lot of information around the internet about how folic acid is not good, but scientifically, there are more success rates for people with MTHFR gene mutations with folic acid versus the other forms. This type of research is done at St. Mary’s with test groups (that information cannot be found on the internet).

    I have also been prescribed 40mg of Clexane (heparin) once daily from the day of a positive pregnancy test. I am now 4 weeks pregnant waiting to see what’s next…

    I wanted to share this with you as again, I am going through this with a doctor that works with recurrent miscarriage mostly. I will keep you posted on the outcome of this pregnancy.

    Reply

  12. TK

    I found out I have heterozygous c677t. I asked for the test after my son was born with spina bifida. I am seeking out a functional medicine doctor now but is there any reason to have my husband tested for a mthfr mutation?

    Reply

  13. Kristen

    Hi there,

    I’ve been doing a lot of reading about MTHFR mutation. How would I know if I have it? Is this something that my OBGYN would have told me? Thanks!

    Reply

  14. Elisa M.

    Hello! I am MTHFR heterozygous and C677t homozygous. I would like to get pregnant soon but the issue is that I can NOT tolerate methylated folate. I become completely anxious and manic even in small amounts. I tried folinic acid and methylated b12 and had other negative side effects. I am confused about which prenatal to take. For now, I have been making sure to ingest the maximum amount of natural folate through food (including a daily smoothie with spinach, mango, strawberries, raspberries, avocado, flax seeds, cashew milk, hemp protein powder and barley grass) I have been eating other very high folate foods and I wonder if I could continue this throughout pregnancy or if a pre-natal is completely necessary. I can’t take a synthetic one because of the folic acid and I can’t seem to tolerate any of the methylated versions. My doctor is firm that I should be taking a prenatal if I’m considering trying to get pregnant in the next few months but I can’t not seem to find which one to take. I have a history of autoimmune illness and Lyme Disease and I’ve been working for the past three years to get healthy enough to be able to conceive. Any tips about this are greatly appreciated. Thank you! Please let me know your thoughts!

    Reply

    1. Ahomestead

      I’d be curious what Andrea’s perspective is on this question too. I’m Heterozygous, am first time pregnant, completely natural and the last time I took a folate b vitamin including b6 and b12 I ended up with b6/b12 poisoning in my blood. Do not do well with folate supplements and was thinking if I try to increase my food daily intake if that would be substantial.

      Reply

      1. Andrea Post author

        Unfortunately I can’t advise you on supplements or what to take or not take. I recommend finding a doctor who can do some vitamin testing. See the resources page on the site for lists of functional medicine doctors and naturopaths who usually know more about these issues than average docs. Good luck!

        Reply

    2. Kayla D

      I’m wondering what you decided about the prenatal during pregnancy? I too have the MTHFR mutation and I CANNOT tolerate folate in even the tiniest doses. I have the same symptoms as you… anxiety, palpitations, parasthesias and even suicidal ideations. It’s terrifying! I would say that just getting folate from diet would be the safest way to go. I hope everything turned out well for you.

      Reply

      1. Elisabeth

        I found a great one (I think) and I’m due in two weeks! It’s organic folate from food and not folic acid or methylated. Pure Synergy pure natal from natural organic food sources. Hopefully it worked out for baby too 🙂 my folatlevels have been consistent all p

        Reply

  15. Cindy Marshall

    Hi, Andrea! Thank you for all of this great information.
    I was told I have a MTHFR mutation about 10 years ago as a teen through investigation blood working into my anovulation issues. I never paid much attention to it because I was not concerned about getting pregnant at the time and it doesn’t seem to be affecting my day-to-day functionality. But, now my to-be husband and I are talking about trying for a baby and I am getting nervous. I have been taking the Seeking Health’s Homocystex Plus supplement (thoughts on this supplement?), TMG (betaine), and fish oil for the past 2 months.
    My main question is where do I get started with this investigation? Should I make an appointment with my OB and get a referral out to a Reproductive Endocrinologist? I want to make sure I am taking to right steps in dealing with this before we try for a baby in 6-12 months. Any information would be so appreciated!
    Thank You!!

    Reply

  16. Jessica Bell

    I’m wondering what you think about the Cal Prop 65 Warning on the Seeking Health Optimal Prenatal? I’ve seen their stated lead and cadmium levels in their regular multivitamin (the reason for the warning on that particular vitamin) and I’m wondering if you know what they are in the Prenatal? I just ordered these based on your recommendation and now am very concerned about starting to take them without more info. I am in early pregnancy after 2 miscarriages.

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Hi Jessica – thanks for bringing this to my attention. I see a lot of those Cal Prop 65 warnings on a lot of products, some manufacturers put them on their packages and some don’t. California is the only state requiring it to my knowledge. There is actually a post on Seeking Health about this very topic so I will refer you there. I took these prenatals for about three years with excellent results and never a concern or side effect. My child is really healthy, smart and advanced for his age in most things physically and mentally…so I stand by my recommendation. I trust Dr. Lynch and don’t think he would create anything harmful. That said, you have to make the best choice for you. I encourage you to contact the company and get their take on it and perhaps do a bit further research on each individual ingredient yourself to make the best choice. Ultimately you have to vet each product you take and ensure it is right for you. Here are the articles I have found pertaining to this as a starting point:
      http://www.seekinghealth.com/blog/cal-prop-concern/
      http://oehha.ca.gov/prop65/p65faq.html
      http://www.seekinghealth.com/media/Prop65.pdf

      Reply

  17. Andrea Post author

    Hi Sam – it contains K2, which is the better form. I was saying that it doesn’t contain K1. I can’t speak to the vitamin A, however, Dr. Lynch has done so much extensive research that I assume it should be in there. Maybe try asking on the Seeking Health site… Good luck!

    Reply

  18. Shayma

    Dr.doctor I wanna ask about the different between folic acid and folte I loss my baby by this mthfr heterozygous now I am pregnant and I don’t have any folic acid into need the name of vitamin folate or folic acid to buy
    In last I would like to thank you for your time

    Reply

  19. Jessica

    I was just called by my OBGYN that I tested positive for MTHFR. I was informed by the nurse over the phone. I find this very unprofessional since she was unable to answer any questions. I just kept hearing this is very common and normal. After researching online, I don’t find this normal. The doctor’s recommendation is to take a specific vitamin (never mentioned the name). I’m just supposed to go pick it up from the pharmacist. After 1 month, they want to run the test again. Why would they need to run the test again if I tested positive. I guess what should they see differently on this second test? Is there a high/low level as compared to normal. I was not given any other information which is very frustrating. Since I work in the medical field, of course, I want to know and understand every aspect of this. Thank you for your time and advice. Jessica

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Hi Jessica – yes, very frustrating…MTHFR is common but not normal. It’s a genetic test so re-testing would not yield different results. I would call back and ask what specific mutations you have. Perhaps they wanted to re-test something else?

      Reply

  20. Gemma

    Hi there. I read your site and the link to Dr. Stephen Well’s site and I’m confused. You say (and Iunderstand why) that Folgard is not helpful, and yet in his protocol he actually recommends it. I’m so confused. I’m hetero MTHFR and have been told to use LMWH in the last month of my pregnnacy only (which seems out of synch with’other info I’ve read on MTHFR causing early pregnnacy loss due to placental detachment). Do you have any other resources/info you could share with me? I’d be very grateful. Thanks.

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Folgard contains high dose synthetic folic acid. That used to be what they recommended but we now know that’s not correct. You want the active form, methylfolate. If you scroll up in this article I recommend the brand I prefer that has the correct forms. As for heparin, I can’t advise you on that – you have to make that decision with your doctor as there are many factors that come into play. I did not need heparin and I am compound hetero…but someone else with the same mutations might. Good luck!

      Reply

  21. ally

    Hi Andrea- did you ever find an answer to the k1 in thorne prenatal? My drs don’t see it as a concern, but to be honest it bothers me too, as does the copper. Seeking Health has k2 in the same amount however. I know k2 is important for calcium transport, but I was under the impression it also helps blood to clot, correct?

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      K2 is the vitamin you want, from my understanding. I don’t think it has the same clotting properties as K1.

      Reply

    2. Katherine Winchek

      Hello. I have FVL and MTHFR as well. I take vitamin d3 and k2 because k1 is the vitamin k that increases clotting. I use “Metagenetics D3 10,000 with K2” because L2 helps the body absorb the vitamin D. I also do a weekly jnjection of b12 hydroxocobalamin as opposed to methylated b12s. It has showed a lot of promise!! I feel…..normal.

      Reply

  22. Kelly

    Thank you for this information! I’m wondering if you know, if you have a MTHFR mutation (or two in my case) and are not taking any special supplements but your folate and B12 levels are consistently good, does that mean you body is methyating enough on it’s own? thanks

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      How are you testing the levels, Kelly? The short answer is that it’s difficult to tell without doing a pathways test. I actually have no idea how to tell if you are methylating adequately. Are you having symptoms? Is your diet generally good? Your environment? I caution against relying on RBC (the standard) tests for vitamin levels. Something like Spectracell Micronutrient is a better way to test.

      Reply

      1. Kelly

        Thanks for the quick response! The short story is that I just found out I am compound heterozygous and I have a 2yr old. I didn’t know about this while I was pregnant and didn’t take any of the supplements I’m learning I should have. To make it worse, my prenatal contained folic acid. My daughter is wonderful and is healthy except for some very severe GI allergies, a mild lip-tie and some behavioral issues but I’m losing sleep at night worrying about what other internal problems she may have from not getting enough folate while I was pregnant. I had my vitamin levels checked monthly while pregnant and kept them in range but I’m understanding from you that may not have been enough to rely on… I ate pretty healthy (zero simple sugars but lots of carbs from my one craving..tortilla chips and lots of veggies, but also lots of dairy and a lot of meat to keep my ever-drooping iron levels up) and ate probably 70% organic and steered clear of all toxins (I was a little over-kill on that actually). Although I did learn that my favorite Pryex bowls, which I used throughout my pregnancy and for years before, are very high in lead, but we had our lead levels checked a while back and they were low (<2). I want to test my daughter for the mutation (from what I understand she has to have at least one, since I have 2). Are these the right things to test for? MTHFR DNA Analysis, homocysteine levels, 5-MTHF levels. This is so confusing and overwhelming and our doctors are not too familiar with this area. Thanks so much again.

        Reply

  23. Paulina

    Dear Andrea, thank you so much for this post. It gives hopes. We have been trying for 9 months, I had an early miscarriage in April 2015 and I have just found out that I am heterozygous for C677T. My husband is being tested as well. This was a recommendation from our naturopath. My OB-Gyn was not familiar with this polymorphism, however, she mentioned that my slightly higher FSH (all the other results were perfectly normal, including anti Mullerian hormone) could be explained by not assimilated folic acid=”bad” quality eggs, which was resulting in not being able to get pregnant. I really hope that taking methylated foliate will solve the problem 🙂 very soon.
    Thank you once more!! 🙂

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      I hope so too, Paulina! I also did a total health overhaul, so you may wish to read through more of the posts on this blog as I had a number of things going on that can cause the fertility workup to read poorly. Good luck!

      Reply

      1. Paulina

        Yes, we are already doing it, detox, testing for food intolerances, filtered water, organic food, special supplements, avoiding EM radiation etc., You name it we do it 🙂 fingers crossed

        Reply

  24. Louise

    Hi, thank you for an informative website. I have a sad story of having a termination at 16 weeks in 2012 due to our baby having a bad case of spinal bifida and spinal tethering, we started trying again and I double dosed on normal folic acid for months and I am 16 weeks pregnant now again to find out that our baby is Down syndrome! My research found this word MTHFR and explains a lot of my symptoms and I will be getting myself and my husband tested for this gene mutation as there must surely be something wrong for this to happen to us, I have no trouble falling pregnant or caring past 12 weeks, just these terrible birth defects. I hope it is something along the lines of mthfr so that I can begin healing and hopefully have a healthy child one day.

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      So sorry to hear of your troubles, Louise. As discussed in the article above, you want to take methylfolate, NOT folic acid…

      Reply

  25. Jennifer

    Hi everyone. I lost my baby when I was 3 months pregnant (about two weeks ago). I knew I had a blood clot in my arm while I was pregnant, so they started me on Lovenox. After I lost the baby, I found out I have compound heterozygous MTHFR. I’m really struggling to get through this, as I feel like I’m slowly losing hope to have a baby. I’ve always been healthy my entire life, I’m very young, and I was just married. Anyone that has success stories with compound heterozygous MTHFR or any success stories, please help! Right now, I’m on a different blood thinner since I’m not pregnant, but they only told me to take B12 1,000mcg once a week… That doesn’t seem like enough to help me?

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Hi Jennifer – I’m very sorry for your loss. I had a successful pregnancy and have a very healthy four month old now, so I am a comp hetero success story. But I can’t tell you how much of what supplement to take, unfortunately, because our needs are all so different. Are you able to find a naturopath or other doctor who knows about MTHFR to help you?

      Reply

      1. Jennifer

        I have an appointment to see one doctor who knows SOMETHING about MTHFR… But doesn’t specialize in it or anything. She’s just a PCP. My OB tells me I have nothing to worry about and I do not need supplements, while all other doctors tell me I do. I am switching OBs to see if I can find someone who specializes in high risk (since I did have a blood clot during pregnancy) who might know something. Any advice on finding a doctor who knows something? My hematologist doesn’t know much, and only told me to take B12 1,000mcg once per week. It seems like everyone else is taking multiple supplements. I feel like I cannot find answers, and I just want to try to get pregnant again.

        Reply

        1. Bridget

          Hi Jennifer,
          I’m also compound heterozygous – had 2 miscarriages in 2014 and have now been taking my supplement for 3 months so we’re going to start trying again – I take 3mg of Methylcobalamin (B12) every day and the Seeking Health Optimum Prenatal – I have been advised to take baby aspirin as soon as we fall pregnant and then monitor my homocysteine levels from there – if they rise I’ll be on injectable blood thinners. I saw a whole team of naturopaths here in Sydney and a lot of their emphasis was on good diet – I don’t eat grain or dairy and try mainly for organic so they said this might be why my homocysteine was normal.. Keep me updated – I can’t wait to hear your success story! X

          Reply

          1. Jennifer

            I just met with a doctor who told me to start the Seeking Health prenatal you mentioned above. I have to supplement with a few extra things, but not too bad. I made the decision to switch back onto Lovenox (after I lost my pregnancy they put me on Xarelto – which is not safe to get pregnant on). The Lovenox is actually $15 cheaper with my insurance than the Xarelto. Things are finally looking up… Waiting a few weeks until all my supplements kick in. My homocysteine level is a little elevated, but they think with the correct prenatal it will be down in a week or two. I’m going to be retested. Everything my doctor told me is what this blog mentions… Thank you for putting ACCURATE information out there. I know how hard it can be to find a doctor who knows about MTHFR.

    2. Laura B.

      Just wanted to say you are in my prayers. I had 5 miscarriages before I gave birth to a healthy baby boy in April 2010. He is now a active, healthy, ball of joy and is 5 years old! I had another miscarriage in 2012 (blighted ovum) but we were not actively trying at that time. The only think I did differently when I prepared for my son was take Omega 3 Fish Oil on top of my pre-natal, 80 baby aspirin, and with a prescription for vaginal prometrium . I also did shots of 40 mg Lovanox once day once I confirmed my pregnancy. I am starting to prepare my body this month. We want to start trying in Jan for baby #2. I’ll be 30 later this year so I am not getting my hopes too high but I want to believe I can have another miracle baby!

      Reply

      1. Andrea Post author

        Thank you, Laura – not sure if you’ve read along later in the blog but we have a very healthy, active five month old now =) Good luck to you on your next attempt!!

        Reply

  26. mrmom45

    Hello, I have MTHFR C677T homozygous (2 copies) and am currently a mother of a healthy 3 months baby. I had had two previous early miscarriages and 1 chemical pregnancy.
    My regimen: Prenatal pills, Folate (L-5-MTHF, metafolin or vit.B9 – same thing) – 4,000 mg per day, Vit B12 as methylcobalamin – 2,000 mg, B6 as pyridoxial-5-phosphate – 50 mg, Fish Oil – EPA 1000 mg DHA 400 mg, Baby Aspirin – 81 mg, Lovenox shots 40 ml once a day before going to bed. Progesterone cream 100 mg vaginal suppository daily in the morning.
    Progesterone stopped by week 14th.
    Lovenox stopped by week 16th.
    Aspirin stopped by week 35th.
    I purchased all vitamins on SeekingHealth website. I spent so many nights on this and other websites reading comments of women desperately trying to get pregnant and give birth to a healthy baby – all in between my recurrent miscarriages, that I promised to myself that once I have a baby I will go back and post my success story. Good luck!

    **Editor’s note** – There is no “one-size fits all” protocol for MTHFR. Please consult with your health practitioner for advice in your specific situation.

    Reply

    1. Bridget

      Mrmom45!!
      Thank you thank you thank you !

      It’s SO amazing to hear success stories – you see so few online!
      And really appreciated your supplement list – I’m on a few of those at the moment, but a lot of my dosages are in mcg (micrograms) not mg – where yours the same?

      Thank you again

      Reply

  27. Erin

    Hello and thank you for such a thorough explanation of mthfr. My husband and I have been diagnosed with complete unexplained Infertility. We lost a baby 2 years ago and have not been able to get pregnant naturally since. I recently was diagnosed with homozygous C677T MTHFR. Our naturopath currently has me on a folate rich diet and methylguard Plus.

    Has the research shown anything indicating a link between unexplained infertility and this form of MTHFR? Also, has there been anyone you have known of who despite this diagnosis, still was able to carry to term? We are in the limbo stage with trying to figure out whether or not to pursue IVF or just keep trying naturally since we’ve recently discovered this piece to the puzzle. Any advice we can get helps tremendously, so thank you in advance.

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      I’m an example of someone who has carried a baby to term with this diagnosis (since this post) and there are countless others. The trick is to evaluate all your nutritional deficiencies and sources of systemic dysfunction. I can’t say whether or not you would be successful with IVF because I don’t know your personal health challenges (and even if I did, nobody knows for sure). But I would recommend evaluating any potential health issues fully before investing in IVF to give yourself the best chance. It’s a long road but check out some of the other articles on my blog because I go into just this journey…it is what I had to do myself. Good luck to you! This one may be a good place to start…

      Reply

      1. Erin

        Thank you for your reply… I have found your website very helpful in understanding more about this mutation. I appreciate it 🙂

        Reply

      2. Timea

        Hello,
        I did write a comment here on the past, but I’m getting kind of curious here. Andrea do you have a medical background? They are certain stuff you write, where I feel a bit strange over it. Don’t take it as an attack, but I really would like to know what medical background you have?

        Reply

        1. Andrea

          I do not have a medical background at all, Timea. Please check out the disclaimer to the right. I write about my own experiences and I have a journalism background so I have researched every article I have written pretty intensively. Nothing I talk about comes from anything but my own experience or secondhand research. Was there something in particular giving you trouble? I am not looking to give anyone advice, merely to share my story and get the word out on all of these issues. I found that there was not one place I could go, nor were all the issues stepped out for me. For MTHFR information written by a health practitioner, please see Dr Ben Lynch’s MTHFR.net

          Reply

  28. Jessica

    Andrea, in December 2010 I was 3 months pregnant and had a miscarriage, so I asked to be tested for MTHFR and the doctor at the time decided to send me to Maternal Fetal Medicine doctor and get tested by him. I have one gene of the MTHFR. My husband and I got pregnant in February and had another miscarriage(we actually didn’t find out about MTHFR UNTIL March 2011).My MFM Doctor gave me Prenatal NEEVO DHA, Folbee plus vitamin and I take an 80mg of baby aspirin everyday. We finally got pregnant in June 2011 and had a healthy 37 weaker baby boy February 2012 (I had the start of preeclampsia and had to have amniotic fluid removed since it was hard on my breathing). We decided to try again in for another baby in May 2013 and had had a miscarriage ( I was on vacation and forgot my meds ): ). My MFM Doctor said when I get back from vacation try again soon. No waiting! So we did and ended up Pregnant in June 2013 an had a 33 weeker baby girl in January 2014. She has couple of heart murmurs but they are positive they will close. She’s a very healthy active little girl. They did test to see why we had her early but unfortunately it came out with nothing. But on a good note… I have two healthy Babies!!

    Reply

  29. Penelope

    I am a woman with Spina Bifida and have recently discovered I have the MTHFR mutation C677T heterozygous. I as taking the 5mg megafol (as a woman with Spina Bifida I need 5mg folic acid to lower the risk of Spina Bifida in my baby), but stopped that when I found out I have this mutation.
    What can I take instead of megafol?

    Reply

  30. Greta Simpson

    My medical summary says, “A single copy of the A1298C mutation was identified” but the nurse said it wasn’t a problem. 1. Do I have an MTHFR mutation? 2. Could it have caused my two early miscarriages? 3. All the terminology is confusing me. I don’t know what a homozygous or heterozygous means with MTHFR.

    Here’s the full statement from my blood work… it just doesn’t make sense to me: “Result: A1298C Single mutation (A1298C) identified Interpretation: This patient’s sample was analyzed for the MTHFR mutations C677T and A1298C. A single copy of the A1298C mutation was identified. Results for the C677T mutation were negative. Elevated levels of homocysteine have not been reported when a single A1298C mutation is found.”

    Need help.

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Yes you do have a heterozygous mutation. It is possible that it caused your miscarriages but I can’t say for sure not knowing the rest of your medical history and other mutations or clotting factors. Single 1298 mutations are the least serious supposedly but I am sure they could still cause various issues.

      Reply

  31. kate

    my sons wife is 35 years old and I was diagnosed with poor ovarian reserve and very bad prognosis of having a baby with my own eggs. I was even given the option to consider donor eggs. That was around july 2014. I was absolutely devastated with the news and I arranged an IVF for November 2014 and it failed also, given that I had nothing to lose, I contacted on facebook (Oduduwa Ajakaye) and he send me his herbal product,. Believe it or not… I am already pregnant!

    Reply

  32. Alissa

    Hi

    What is the exact recommended dose of folate while pregnant? I am homozygous c677t I currently take the recommended dose of the optimal seeking health vitamin. My Dr initially prescribed Fabb and I refused to take that. How much folate is too much?
    Many vitamins have folate but then do not have the bioconverted forms of b6 and b12. I don’t like the optimal seeking health vitamin the dose is extremely high and the taste and smell is wretched. I have really tried to find a substitute prenatal but I have yet to find one for MTHFR. Should I take another 800 mg of folate in addition to seeking health or is what I am taking enough?

    Reply

    1. Andrea

      There is no “exact recommended dose” Alissa, as the amount of folate needed is different for each individual. We each have our own unique body chemistry and collection of gene mutations. You might have too much folate if you have symptoms of over-methylation. I have never noticed any smell with the Optimal multivitamins and I take and recommend them because they do have all the bioavailable forms of the B vitamins plus additional support for common mutations affecting pregnancy. It is the best one I’ve found. Unfortunately I cannot advise you on how much to take as this is very individual. I recommend watching Dr. Lynch’s video to help you determine how much you need.

      Reply

      1. Alissa

        Thank-you for the advice. I have been taking prior to this the Swanson activated homocysteine formula which had similar doses. I guess it is just me personally I don’t like the smell or taste. I will continue to take them because they do have all the recommended vitamins for mthfr. Some prenatals like the Thorne have only 500 mcg so I do think the 800 mcg in the selling health works best. I wish I could take less pills but if this helps I will take it. I am on lovenox also daily and BA as protocol. My Dr does not know I switched the vitamins because she thinks fabb is best. I think I am getting enough from the prenatals. Thank you for the advice.

        Reply

  33. Tanya

    Ladies

    Has anyone found a formula that is ok for infants to take with MTHFR
    I am concerned about the folic acid that it says on most. all the ones I have looked at have been organic and still say folic acid
    Also does anyone know if babies are screened at birth( ie : heel stick) for anything that would show a B12 deficiency ?
    Appreciate any advice and comments

    Reply

  34. lindsay

    Hi Andrea,

    Thank you for the wealth of information you have provided here! After 3 miscarriages last year, I just found out that I am heterozygous c677t. My RE has prescribed Folgard, baby aspirin and vitamin d3, but I now know that Folgard is not the right drug for me. Do you know anything about the Mega Food “Baby and Me” prenatals? They are food-based, non GMO and contain no folic acid. Instead, they have 800 mcg of folate from broccoli. They only require you to consume 4 pills per day instead of the 8 required by Seeking Health Optimal prenatal, which makes a huge difference for me as I have a difficult time taking large pills. Would love your opinion. Thanks again and congrats on your pregnancy!

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      I don’t have experience with these, Lindsay. My only comment is that, while better than folic acid, folate is not the same as methylfolate. I believe some people still have a hard time breaking folate down to methylfolate. I’m hoping others could comment on this, either about the prenatal or the use of folate instead of methylfolate. Good luck!

      Reply

      1. lindsay

        Thank you for your fast response, Andrea!

        My RE’s office has gotten back to me regarding my concerns over Folgard and said that my doctor will sometimes prescribe Metanx. From what I have read, Metanx is better because it contains l-methylfolate – would you agree? I was also going through my old bloodwork and saw that my homocysteine level in September was 10.1 (the lab says anything below 10.4 is “normal” but this seems high to me). My doctor did not mention anything about this level or express any concern. Lastly, if I was to take the Metanx, should I also take the Seeking Health prenatal? Thanks so much!

        Reply

        1. Nikki

          Hi, Lindsay! I wanted to weigh in with my experience. I found out in June that I am homozygous for A1298C, after having two miscarriages in a row (my only two pregnancies), within a 6 month timeframe. I did a ton of research and found that methylfolate is the best form of folate to take, so I talked to my RE about it, and he prescribed me Metanx. I also take a baby aspirin every day (along with other vitamins for other issues), AND my prenatals (Vitamin Code RAW Prenatal, which has 800mcg of folate). I ended up getting pregnant just a few days after I started the Metanx, I’m now 23 weeks and baby boy is doing great! I hope it helps you!

          Reply

          1. Lindsay

            Hi Nikki – thank you SO MUCH for sharing your story! I am so sorry for your losses but so happy to hear this pregnancy is going well for you! I just started metanx over the wknd, along with the Mega Food prenatals that have 800 mcg of folate, as well as baby aspirin. Hopefully I will follow in your footsteps soon! Wishing you a happy and healthy rest of your pregnancy!!

  35. jenny

    I want to thank you for this helpful post. I have 2 copies of mthfr c667t mutation. I have also had 5 early miscarriages. This mutation is the only issue that has been found in my many bloodwork pannels. Finally i have found a dr.who will treat this. I am on progesterone, l-methel b6 b12, heparin and low dose asprin. I will let you know how it goes. I wish you all the best for your pregnancy.

    Reply

  36. Marly

    I am so beyond frustrated right now. In 2009 after a normal pregnancy I had an abruption at 27 weeks. My daughter passed away about a week later from a hospital acquired infection. My husband and I moved to a bigger city for better medical care and I found a wonderful OB who agreed to give me lovenox during my pregnancy and non-stress tests from 26 weeks on. I now have two healthy babies. 🙂 I am compound hetero for MTHFR and am the third consecutive woman in my family to have an abruption. I am pregnant again (just found out), have new insurance and unable to see the same OB I had with my two healthy babies. My new OB is referring me to perinatology who do not believe I need any special treatment. He claims there is no research showing that MTHFR poses a risk to baby without hyperhomocystemia or low folate levels. What would you suggest I do?

    Reply

  37. Elizabeth

    Hello Andrea!

    I wanted to ask quickly do you have any research cited on here regarding heterozygous A1298C mutation? Just had my first pregnancy after 15 month’s of actively trying end in a missed miscarriage, and my Naturopath uncovered this mutation. Currently taking Deplin (algal oil, methylated folic acid) 15mg/day per her instructions, which my RE has okayed as well.

    Thanks so much!

    Reply

  38. Bek

    Hi there! Thank you for this valuable information about MTHFR. I have just found out I have two mutations of MTHFR (I’m not sure which yet as I haven’t seen my results in writing). I had 2 miscarriages following IVF and I wasn’t keen to go through a 3rd without having tests done. Along with MTHFR they also found I am positive for anti-cardiolipins, have very low Vitamin D, am insulin resistant and have high IGF-1. After struggling for many years to conceive (thinking it was just my PCOS) this has come as a bit of a shock. I also have one perfectly healthy 4 year old who was conceived naturally… Don’t know how that happened.

    Anyway… I am a bit scared about this diagnosis – and especially worried at the thought that all the fortified bread I have eaten over the years (not to mention all the folic acid I have ingested while TTC for 7 years) has accumulated in my body. Is there really no way to detox it??

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Hi Bek, The best thing to do is to stop ingesting more folic acid and put your body on a cleansing regimen. Good diet, clean food, the right supplements and choosing the right products will help your body to detox. Don’t get discouraged!

      Reply

      1. Bek

        Thanks heaps for your response Andrea!! I appreciate it!
        One more question, if you don’t mind…. I’ve spent most of today researching the foods I can and can’t eat now… *sigh* I have found some of my normal foods contain folate on the ingredients list (not folic acid). Do I need to avoid folate? Could that be the same thing as folic acid?

        Reply

  39. Julie

    My 2 year old was just diagnosed autistic and MTHFR C677T heterozygous. I have a 6 month old that is allergic to every baby formula out there. I’m currently giving him chicken broth with livers in it for formula, but I’m worried about nutrition. I don’t know enough yet about MTHFR and don’t want to give him something wrong (i.e. a supplement with folic acid). Is there a baby vitamin/mineral that would work for him given the MTHFR issue?

    Reply

  40. Amanda

    I am homozygous for MTHFR A1298C. I had no idea and found out after both of my pregnancies and after my first son developed Autism (who has it too!). I had multiple problems with both pregnancies, my first son I had pre-eclampsia, high blood pressure, etc. My second son I had a single umbilical artery (SUA), which I’m told is all related. We went through genetic testing and now everything is making sense – why I react so badly to certain medications and nitrous oxide (depletes folate and B12). I have started supplementing myself with 5-MTHF and B12 and now I’m feeling “normal” again – I feel so much better and am glad we are all able to find out about this and do something about it. We’re done having children, but I wish they could test everyone for this at birth!

    Reply

    1. Michelle

      Hi, thanks for sharing. I have the same MTHFR as you and my husband has the C667 version. We arent able to get pregnant at all. The doctors dont seem to think MTHFR is to blame but if both my husband and I have 2 copies of the gene isnt it impossible to ever get pregnant or have a healthy baby? What did your doctor tell you?

      Reply

  41. Keri

    In 2003 I suffered my first miscarriage. I was told that it was common and no tests were ran. In 2004 I gave birth to my first son. No complications. Normal pregnancy and birth resulting in a healthy baby. In 2010 I had a second miscarriage. My OB ran tests and 20 vials of blood were drawn. The only test that came back positive was for MTHFR. In 2011 I gave birth to my second son and was prescribed Lovenox injections during pregnancy due to the MTHFR diagnosis and had frequent ultrasounds to montior his growth and health. Again there were no complications. Normal pregnancy and birth resulting in a healthy baby. After my pregnancy my OB recommended that I take folic acid and a baby asprin daily. Last month I discovered that I was four months pregnant with my third son. It wasn’t until I felt fetal movement that I was even aware that I was pregnant. My new OB (I moved and it was no longer feasible to see my previous OB) says that Lovenox injections are no longer recommended for MTHFR and that it is not a serious condition that really requires treatment. She decided to prescribe four times the normal amount of folic acid for my peace of mind. My mind is still not a peace. Most doctors I’ve spoken with have never even heard of MTHFR. Others I’ve seen don’t feel like anything needs to be done. My previous OB is the only one that has ever seemed to know anything about it and have a treatment plan. I am so confused. All the information I’ve been given seems to contradict itself. I need guidance and updated information that I can present to my new OB. I don’t want to risk this new life because I was misinformed. Thank you in advance for any insight or advice.

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      I’m so sorry for your losses, Keri. I’ve pulled together a good overview of the information you need in this article here where you posted. I recommend following the links to further resources – and you can also look to sites like this one, listing research. You might also want to learn whether you have other clotting disorders, which would then influence whether you need Lovenox. Good luck!

      Reply

  42. Megan

    I was diagnosed with Homozygous MTHFR A1298C today, and I am scared and confused. I have 2 health boys (5yrs and 2yrs), and just had a missed miscarriage on 10/1/14. I want to have another baby, but after researching the internet about my genetic disorder, I dont know if I’m being stupid/selfish. My Naturopathic doctor gave me a Methylfolate to take, a Multi-mineral, in addition to my Thorne Basic Prenatal. But my question is: am I stupid for wanting to have another baby after learning about this? Am I playing with fate? What are my chances of having a health baby (my #1 concern). Even if I give birth to a living baby, are the chances high that the baby will have developmental problems because I have this disorder (although I will be trying to treat it).

    I NEVER post stuff online, especially this personal, but you respond to everyones comments and would appreciate your advice. If I have to stop at 2 health babies I will. But if I am overreacting and the chances of baby #3 being healthy are high, then I would like to know.

    Thank you

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Hi Megan – I don’t believe that MTHFR mutations should be any kind of death sentence or doom you to curtail expanding your family. As we get older, more toxins accumulate and this could be why you are finding it more difficult to become pregnant later in your life. I don’t think you are stupid at all. I recommend finding a good practitioner to work with and discuss these concerns with him/her. And hopefully that person can get you on a supplement path to bypassing your mutations. Good luck!

      Reply

  43. Maribeth

    I was diagnosed with homo MTHFR mutation C677. I had requested that my OBGYN run the test because my sister had tested positive. I was pregnant at the time I recieved my results. My homocysteine level was normal and was told to continue taking my prenatal and extra folic acid. It took me 2 years and one miscarriage to conceive my first child and we are currently having trouble trying to concieve again. I haven’t thought much about my double mutation because I have felt fine and my homocystein levels were normal. I recently spoke with a dietician that recommended that I be taking methylcobalamine 1000mcg and Deplin 15mg daily. She had a patient that was having trouble concieving and after a few months of taking Deplin became pregnant. Do you have any thoughts on Deplin or can you give me some recommendations. I am a pharmacist and have been trying to educate myself but its a little overwhelming trying to choose the best products to take. I also need to find a new prenatal that does not contain folic acid….any thoughts?

    Thank you
    Maribeth

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Hi Maribeth, I can’t speak to Deplin or dosages or your personal health situation. I recommend some prenatals in this article above. Good luck!

      Reply

    2. Carrie Yamamoto

      I am taking Deplin 15mg and it has made the world of a difference. Not currently pregnant, but my OB said when we are ready that I would be covered for the folic acid aspect. Hope that helps!

      Reply

  44. Andrea Post author

    Hi Sam, yes, there is always the potential for MTHFR to cause these problems; I would definitely encourage your doctor to test. Good luck!

    Reply

  45. Sara

    I am set to do a frozen embryo transfer in about 18 days and just found out I have a mutation this week. My doctor prescribed a 1 mg folic acid prenatal in addition to my over the counter prenatal. Is it too late to switch to folate? How long does it take to start working? I’m kind of freaking out since I had three miscarriages earlier this year (the catalysts to getting tested). I’m also wondering how much I should take? I left messages for my doctor, but am worried they will say the folic acid is fine since that is what they have done for their other patients with the mutation.

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      I’m sorry your doctor gave you outdated advice but this commonly happens. I don’t think it is ever too late to take folate. Unfortunately I can’t tell you how much to take but you may want to just switch to a prenatal like Seeking Health Optimal mentioned in the body of the article. Good luck!

      Reply

  46. Katie

    Wow! After a complete molar pregnancy (twin gestation) and being diagnosed with general anxiety disorder, I just became pregnant again after finding out my mother is MTHFR positive. I am waiting for my doctor to get back to me so that I can be tested as well. I’m currently freaking out, but I’m hoping to have answers soon. Thank you for this article – it’s definitely helped me to advocate for myself, intelligently.

    Reply

  47. Timea

    I wished I would have seen that blog before I got pregnant. My English is not the best, I’m from Switzerland but I live now in Upstate New York. I actually got pregnant 2012 with twins. i was really happy and couldn’t believe my fortune, that I was expecting a baby girl and a baby boy. As I had a lot of bleeding issues in the early pregnancy, my doctor decided to order some specific tests. It came back that I have a MTHFR Mutation. The doctor recommended to take more folic Acid as usual in a pregnancy. Now I realize after reading this blog, that this was anyway not helpful. I was just praying everything would go well but sadly it didn’t. As I was in the 20. Week my Baby boy was diagnosed with the worst condition of a Neural Tube Defect. So we had to decide if we would like to have a selective reduction, since that would give my baby Girl the best chances to survive and staying healthy. It was a horrible decision and a really painful way to go. Heartbroken I had to let my little Boy go. I stayed strong for my unborn baby Girl. Finally she was born 2 months to early, in the summer of 2013, but healthy!!! I’m so thankful to have this little miracle and that she made it. I wished, I would have know more about that Mutation. Sure I don’t know if it would have change anything, but most likely I would be better of with taking methylfolate instead of folic Acid. I will always remember my little baby Boy, he will never be forgoten. I hope he is in good hands where he is now and he can forgive us for this really hard decision we had to make and end his life in the 21. week, in mind to safe an other life.

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Such a bittersweet story, Timea – thank you for having the courage to share. Wishing your family all the best going forward, Andrea

      Reply

  48. Sharon

    Thank you so much for your article! I’ve done a lot of research and it was so nice to find everything MTHFR related to pregnancy in one article! My older sister was diagnosed as being compound heterozygous after RPL (7 MCs) several years ago. Once becoming pregnant I was tested for these mutations (and others). When the results came back homozygous C677T and hetero Factor V Leiden I assumed it would be a death sentence for my 8 week old (at that time) fetus. Today I am 21 weeks and 1 day with a baby boy! I wanted to share what I am taking for others:

    Thorne prenatals (only taking 2/ day because of iron and vitamin k)
    1 mg methyl folate (to supplement for lacking that third Thorne prenatal dose)
    Baby aspirin (1/ day)
    60 mg lovenox injection
    I also take additional calcium (can’t remember the amt) because lovenox has been shown to deplete calcium from bones

    I live in Fort Worth, TX and was lucky enough to get an OB that has MTHFR, RPL and infertility problems. She is wonderful!

    Reply

    1. Mel

      Hi Sharon! I am in your area and have many of the same issues that you do. I am having a hard time finding a good doctor who understands. Would you mind sharing your doctor’s name?

      Thank you so much in advance!

      Reply

    2. Melissa

      Could you please give me the name of your Fort Worth doctor? I’m also in Fort Worth. Heterozygous c677t and the fertility doctor is just loading me up on Folgard RX 2.0 with a statement that he feels my 4 early miscarriages and not viable pregnancy is not related. Thanks.

      Reply

    3. Bridget

      Thank you SO much for sharing that Sharon!!
      I am compound heterozygous and have had 2 missed miscarriages in 2014 and am now TTC again – I’m on the ‘Seeking Health’ prenatal (8 tablets daily) Methylcobalamin (2 tablets daily) and baby aspirin once pregnant – I opted out of lovenox injections (unless homocystiene levels rise during pregnancy) the info in Australia is super outdated and I have only found naturopaths (not Dr’s) with even a remote idea about MTHFR so im not sure if im doing the right thing! Your post is giving me hope 🙂 thank you thank you thank you x

      Reply

    4. Mary

      Sharon can you please give me the name of your obgyn.Have been searching for one who treats MTFHR due to recurrent miscarriages.Thank you

      Reply

  49. Ewa

    Hi. I am looking to purchase the Optimum Prenatal vitamins. What is the recommended dose? It says 8, but it seems like a lot to take in one day. Please advise.

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Hi Ewa, Yes – 8 is the standard dosage to get all the nutrients that are included in the vitamin. I don’t think you would want to take less than that as you wouldn’t be getting enough of what you need then. You get a one month’s supply per bottle.

      Reply

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  53. Ann

    Andrea, thank you so much for your sharing and I am so happy to find your blog, I wish I found it earlier though, it`s very knowledgeable and helpful for women having RPL with MTHFR issues. I wish you well and all the best!

    Reply

  54. Jen

    Hi Andrea, I am SO happy I found your blog! I was diagnosed with the MTHFR defect when my husband and I were trying to conceive. My hematologist put my on 1mg Folic Acid & a Baby Aspirin once a day. I am also taking regular prenatal vitamins. I read your article but there’s so much information and I’m having a hard time wrapping my head around all of it! Maybe even panicking a little (lol). So the 1mg Folic Acid is NOT a good thing? And I should consider changing the brand of vitamins I’m taking? I’m not sure exactly what I should be talking to my doctor about? Thank you so much for your help!

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Hi Jen, High dose folic acid tends to be the old, outdated recommendation for managing MTHFR in pregnancy. As per Dr. Ben Lynch, you are better off with a prenatal containing methylfolate and the active forms of the B vitamins (please see the prenatal vitamin section of this article). Good luck!

      Reply

  55. Tabatha Andrews

    In 2004 I found out I was homozygous for C677T after a miscarriage. Conception has never been an issue for me and with my second pregnancy I was treated with Heparin, Predisone, Prometrium, Folgard and baby aspirin. My blood pressure spiked around week 35 and I was induced, I had a healthy baby boy. A few years later in 2007 and living in a different state, we wanted to become pregnant again. After consulting with several doctors, the consensus was that blood thinner wasn’t really necessary for MTHFR pregnancies, so I did not take Heparin and just took Folgard and baby aspirin. At 39 weeks, my blood pressure spiked, I was induced and had healthy baby boy.

    It’s now 2014 and I am turning 39 next week. We would like to have one more baby and I have just begun my research. Thank you for your site. A lot of new information has become available! I am trying to assess my risks. I have an appointment with maternal fetal care next week. My diet has never been better, I pretty much eat clean. I just ordered the Optimal Prenatal vitamins. I want to give myself and future baby the best possible odds of successful pregnancy. Seeing that my blood pressure seems to be the main problem during pregnancy, can you offer any other advice?

    Thank you!!! Tab

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Hi Tabatha, I’ve always heard that baby aspirin was helpful for blood pressure so unfortunately I don’t have any additional advice for you – perhaps another reader will chime in. From what I’ve read, blood pressure spikes can happen with anyone, not just us MTHFR’ers. Hopefully your MFM can provide some better insight – I see one and they seem versed in all these issues. Good luck! Let us know if you find out any info =)

      Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      You could try Thorne in the meantime – not my favorite but should do in a pinch. There is also the Seeking Health prenatal powder, which I had to use the first three months because of out of stock issues, just as good as the capsules. I did an analysis of these in the article. Good luck!

      Reply

  56. Sue

    Andrea, I’ve just come across your wonderful blog. Thank you for sharing your experiences and research. This is very helpful information.

    After years of infertility and many very early miscarriages, we moved on to donor eggs. Our second cycle was successful and I thought our nuchal translucency ultrasound last week was just a routine. Boy, was I wrong. We were shocked to find that our 13 week baby had acrania – one of the most severe forms of NTDs. I have one MTHFR (1298) and my husband has both 677 and 1298. We have both been taking methyl folate 2 mg / day for years, along with other methyl forms of B vitamins. I admit I slacked off from my homocysteine protocol slightly because of ‘vitamin fatigue’ (too many for too long). But my guards now up again.

    We are hopeful that our next attempt will be successful, and grateful that it was a very clear decision for us to terminate the pregnancy. It also reinforced that we really do want to be parents.

    Anyways, I thought it may be helpful for others to share the protocol for treating methylation / homocysteine problems naturally:

    http://www.lef.org/protocols/heart_circulatory/homocysteine_reduction_01.htm

    Best wishes to all the other hopeful parents-to-be.

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      I’m so sorry for your loss, Sue. Thank you very much for sharing this information and I hope you and your husband’s next pregnancy is a success!

      Reply

  57. Rachel

    Hi,

    Is it safe to methylate by means of healhty eating and methylfolate supplementatiom while I still have amalgam fillings preseny in my mouth? I have decided not to have them removed because we are ready to start a family as soon as possible. I really appreciate your post!

    Rachel

    Reply

      1. Andrea Post author

        I can’t speak to the “safety” of anything, however, I have always heard it is better to have the fillings removed by an experienced practitioner. Not sure what the best timing will be for you. I recommend consulting with a biological dentist on this topic.

        Reply

  58. Nadia

    Andrea, do you have a resource for what to do once the baby is born, to help it develop well?

    I’m planning to test for MTHFR at birth, but beyond that not sure what I precautions I should take do if the baby has the mutation. My pediatrician did note that the baby doesn’t get my vitamins through breastmilk necessarily, so the baby might need supplementation even if I’m supplementing and BF’ing.

    (I happen to live in Austin, and am going to try to get a work-up with Dr. Stewart, but it will be 2-3 months after the baby is born, so hoping to have a plan prior to that so the baby is getting what it needs in the early months.)

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      I don’t have a resource, Nadia, but it is a good question. I would say to avoid folic acid (in formulas, etc) in the meantime and I’m sure Dr. Stewart will advise you. I’m about to put together a green nursery and registry guide as I believe that having non-toxic baby products and furniture is extremely important. Congrats and good luck!

      Reply

  59. Kate

    Hi there

    I have just had a baby girl at 21 weeks who had spina bifida. She was so beautiful, but unfortunately was only with us for a few special hours. Following this, I have tested positive for C677T Heterozygous mutation, which I understand is a milder form of the mutation.

    I have been told by my obestrician to take 5mg of folic acid for 3 months before we try to concieve again, but my naturopath states that I should be taking natural folate. I am currently taking a natural form of folate, but wanted to know if you have any experience and know of people who are at high risk of having a child with a neural tube defect taking the equivilant of 5mg of natural folate, or is there something wrong with such a high amount?

    Many thanks

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      I’m so sorry for your loss, Kate. There is nothing wrong with taking the active form of folate (methylfolate) in that amount (if you can tolerate it). You would actually be more likely to have negative side effects from the folic acid in such a high dose. Most OBs are following an outdated protocol for MTHFR when prescribing high dose folic acid. I hope your next pregnancy is a success! Good luck

      Reply

  60. Paola

    Hi!
    I’m heterocygote A1298C and I want to donate the cord umbilical. Can I do it? or it is risky for the receptor?
    Thanks,
    Paola

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Hi Paola, This is a little outside my knowledge area – are you talking about cord blood? I would think it wouldn’t be an issue because they are going to utilize the stem cells (which seemingly wouldn’t alter the entire DNA sequence of the person who received it) – BUT I really have no idea and I recommend you contact the people handing your donation and ask them this question.

      Reply

      1. Paola Maldonado

        Thank you very much for your quick response. The problem is that in Mexico is really new this and I can’t found someone that knows about this mutation and they are like scared only hearing that I have a mutation and that is related with trombophilia, so they are telling me that I can’t donate because I can pass the mutation.
        Where can I found some facts that validate that I can donate and save lives instead of trasshing the opportunity because of wrong information?

        Reply

        1. Andrea Post author

          If an online search doesn’t turn up the information, could you call one of the cord blood banking centers in the United States such as Stemcyte? There are a few and I can’t remember the names offhand but just do a search online…

          Reply

  61. Carla

    Hi

    I have just been diagnosed with A1298c and I have been told to take 100mg aspin carriage daily . I am 7 weeks pregnant and am just a bit concerned if this is the right thing to do ???

    Thank you
    Carla

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Hi Carla, the usual recommendation is baby aspirin, which is 81mg – at least this is what my maternal fetal medicine doctor has referred to me (I am 18 weeks pregnant). Perhaps just check back with your doctor as I have no idea if the extra 19mg would pose a problem. But aspirin in general is contraindicated in pregnancy (aside from these small doses). Wishing you a happy, healthy 9 months! Congrats!

      Reply

  62. Sarah

    Hi there,

    I am glad that I came accross your article. I recently found out that I have Heterozygous MTHFR. I have had 3 MC’s, and I ended up changing Doctors and my newest one decided to give me blood work that uncovered this. I am relieved but really stressed out. I am supposed to go see a Genetic Counselor soon. I feel more lost and confused than anything. A part of me is scared that I won’t ever be able to keep a baby full term, and another part of me feels that if I do, what if there are complications with the little one??! Should I even bother trying anymore? I have to say though, reading all of these comments, it makes things look much better. I hope and pray that I will be successful with a healthy little one. My question is, can I start “self” medicating with Folate, Baby Asprin, etc?

    Thanks again for the article and research!!

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Hi Sarah – so sorry for your losses. You can definitely try the folate and supplements, but I would recommend finding a knowledgeable practitioner before you go ahead with baby aspirin. MTHFR is just one piece of the puzzle and you probably want to figure out what else could be going on and whether you need BA. You could have other clotting issues or mutations. Or you could not. But it would be better to check it all out than to guess. Good luck!

      Reply

  63. Elisa

    Hi im so glad i found this site.. 2 years ago i had 2 miscarriages so i got some blood work done and tested positive for MTHFR positive for one copy of the C6677t and one copy of the A1298c mutations my concerned was that the doc. Just said oh i have found ur problem and gave me a copy of my lab work along with a APS blood disorder info. Now do those 2 things have something in common (MTHFR) and (APS) and i asked what do i have to do now? What precautions i have to take? His answer oh u have to take a shot to thinner ur blood once a day thru the whole pregnancy but he didn’t sound or seem concerned so he said oh let me know when u get pregnant again. Then i moved to another state so i had to look for another doc. Since we were not trying to get pregnant over a year when by and oct 2013 i took a pregnancy test and was positive a week later i had my period so when to a new doc. And he said i had a chemical pregnancy! Another unsuccessful pregnancy 🙁 so i brought him my old lab blood work about MTHFR and he send me to a fertility clinic. Made my app. When saw the fertility specialist he did not mention anything about this gene he only talked about doing some blood work to check my chromosomes and some other several testing! I did understand his reason for all this testing cuz he said he want to make sure that that is only problem i have but still left me hanging on the air with not info about MTHFR I have been waiting to do “all those test” “due to the financial situation. 🙁 after 2 months of my fertility app. In jan 2014 found out i was pregnant again and boom had another mc at 5 weeks and 4 days! Im so confused and frustrated nobody or the doc! I have seen had taking the time to explain to me exactly what this gene is what it does to my body and pregnancies? What steps i have to take? What i can and cant eat ? What should i take I’m desperate, emotionally devastated trying to find info on my own. Help! I wanna have a baby if someone can just tell me what steps to take! Who i should see! Thank you! God bless

    Reply

    1. Elisa

      Forgot to mention that I also got tested for APS last year and lab work come back with as negative results so I’m confused even more about why my first doc will give me a copy of APS along with MTHFRand said of APS is just a short name for this MTHFR gene problem? Is that true?

      Reply

    2. Andrea Post author

      Hi Elisa – I’m so sorry for your losses. Please review the information in this article and also find a doctor who takes MTHFR seriously. I’ve never heard of APS… If you have more specific questions about your personal situation, please post in the forums. Thanks!

      Reply

      1. Elisa

        Hey thanks for getting back to me the APS is a short name for Antiphospholipid syndrome and he said that was the short name for mthfr blood disorder i have?! I also was looking at the prenatal that are in this website (optimal prenatal) right now Im taking all natural prenatal from Biotics Research Corporation! But for all i have read sounds like the optimal prenatal will be my best option? Thanks again

        Reply

  64. michelle

    Hi, thank you so much for posting this, its very educational. My husband is homozygous C677T and I am homozygous A1298. We had 2 failed IVF’s because our embryos were abnormal. We only found out about our MTHFR mutation after the first failed IVF. We started taking metanx vitamin prescribed by our doctor before our 2nd IVF and had similar results with all abnormal embryos. I was wondering if you knew if us being both homozygous for MTHFR affects embryo quality and if we will ever produce a healthy embryo? I cannot find any research regarding couples who are both homozygous. If you know anything it would greatly help us. Thanks for your time!

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Hi Michelle, I’m really not sure about how MTHFR mutations would affect embryo quality. What I am surprised about is that the clinic you are working with did not refer you and your husband to a genetic counselor before putting you through a second IVF cycle. I know of at least one couple who had to do a few thousand dollars worth of genetic testing before undergoing IVF. Because it is such an expensive and invasive procedure, and because of your questions regarding genetics, this is something I recommend you do before trying again. There could be so many other things going on here besides MTHFR mutations. Given the fact that they are so common in the population, I can’t imagine that there haven’t been parents with your mutations before. But I have no data on this. Good luck!

      Reply

      1. michelle

        Hi Andrea, Thank you so much for your response. We did do a genetic kareotyping test and my husband also has a balanced translocation on his chromosomes. This is something we cannot change and causes miscarriages but would not cause abnormal embryos. We can do genetic testing on embryos to avoid having a baby with this. That is why we thought MTHFR could have been the cause of the abnormal embryos. I wish there was more literature regarding both parents with MTHFR. Thanks so much for your help!

        Reply

  65. Sandra

    Thank you so much for this article. I was told I have MTHFR after my third miscarriage and my husband and I have been TTC since our last miscarriage. It’s been 10 months with no success. I have C677t & 1298. My OBGYN didn’t know very much and I have done most of my research on my own. It’s a pretty big emotional roller coaster for sure. I have been taking Methyl Folate and Methyl Cobalamin along with aspirin (because of my own research) but think I will order the prenatal you have suggested. I have started seeing a naturopath (he has given me supplements) as well and hope this all helps. Again thank you for this post.

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      I’m so sorry for your losses, Sandra. Do try to stay hopeful and I wish you luck on your journey. It is so difficult figuring everything out but sounds like you are on a good path with your naturopath.

      Reply

  66. Laura

    Thank you for this post and your blog. I’ve had 4 early losses and have been diagnosed with 2 copies of A1298C MTHFR. I am taking Prena1 prenatal which has 1mg of quatrafolate, baby asprin, luteal support and heparin after ovulation. This is my 1st cycle on the heparin and I’m hoping this will be my month 🙂

    Reply

  67. Tristan

    Hi There! I’ve had 3 healthy babies with no complications. I have just a one strand mutation of the MTHFR. I was thinking of having another baby but every pregnancy I have gotten sicker and sicker. My last one I had morning sickness for 6 months and fatigue like no one would believe. I stayed away from all the excess folic acid my doctor prescribed me and ate spinach with vinegar daily the first 3 months and smoothies with kale to get as much in naturally as I could. My newest one has a fish eye, the little closed hole right above her anal area where she was just shy of spina bifida. 🙁 Do you think the Optimal Prenatal would help me if I choose to have another baby? I feel like my morning sickness has to be from nutritional deficiencies that regular prenatal vitamins and a healthy diet do not solve.

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Yes, absolutely, Tristan. I noticed that they are backordered until April 25 so I tried the Seeking Health Optimal Prenatal powder this month instead, which is nice – you just mix it into water, milk (I use almond) or a smoothie. It’s the most comprehensive prenatal I’ve found and it covers other SNPs too.

      Reply

  68. Tammy

    Thank you for your website. I wanted to offer hope to those in this community regarding pregnancy. I have two miracle children and did not learn of my genetic condition until after complications with my second pregnancy. My husband and I conceived naturally without problems. After two very tough pregnancies, we learned that both of us carry the MTHFR mutation on both gene sets. Mine is the more rare and dangerous form, however. Our geneticist was shocked and amazed that we were able to get pregnant in the first place.
    I won’t sugar-coat it. My daughter was two months premature due to an abrupted placenta and contractions began in the 25th week of pregnancy with my son. I was tested then and learned of the condition. So many questions were answered instantly. Thankfully our children (now six and four) are healthy, smart and happy! I can only attribute this to our nutrition, healthy lifestyles and God! Good luck to you and now I’m scheduling some blood work for my thyroid.

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Thank you so much for sharing your story, Tammy – it’s inspirational and I love hearing about good outcomes! Wishing your family continued health…

      Reply

    2. michelle

      Hi Tammy, My husband and I are also both homozygous for MTHFR and have been trying to conceive for 2 years with 3 failed IUIs and 2 failed IVFs (embryos all died the first IVF and the second IVF I miscarried after a week). Seeing your story gave me some hope and I was wondering if you would be willing to share with me what kind of changes you and your husband did for a successful pregnancy? My doctor just told us to take the vitamin metanx and that’s about it. He didn’t seem to worry much about our diagnosis but I feel like this is what is contributing to our inability to have children. Any advice you have is greatly appreciated! thanks!

      Reply

  69. Holly

    So glad I found this blog. I have had 5 losses in the past 2.5 years. Most between 4 and 6 weeks. My 4th I had an sch at 7 wks and bled most of the pregnancy till my membranes ruptured around 16 wks and I delivered at 19wks my stillborn daughter. After our 5th loss at Christmas we began doing lots of research. I read Dr Beer’s book and a couple others. We just found out my husband and I are both carriers for MTHFR. Still awaiting some other test results. Thanks for the helpful info!

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Thank you for sharing your story, Holly. I’m so sorry to hear of your losses. I hope you find answers soon!

      Reply

  70. Ashley

    Thank you so much for this blog! My husband and I have started trying to get pregnant but I have this mutation and just recently found out about it. I have had one successful pregnancy…3 1/2 years ago and was diagnosed with RA right after. With the help of a nutritionist, I found out I have this mutation and am on these supplements (that you have listed above). How long do you think I should wait until I try and get pregnant, I am a little scared now. Also….do you take the prenatals as well as extra folate? Thank you!!!

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Hi Ashley, Thanks so much for your comment! I generally go by the advice that it takes 90-120 days for the effects of dietary and supplement changes to have an impact on egg and sperm quality. You don’t mention which mutations you have – the more MTHFR mutations present the lower the enzyme activity. If your husband also has the mutations you want to get him onto the supplement regimen as well (methylation is important to men’s reproductive health, please see my latest news roundup for the study). I hope that addressing your mutations will help your RA (I’m assuming you mean Rheumatoid Arthritis?) as well. Yes, I take the Seeking Health Optimal Prenatal along with extra methylfolate and methylcobalamin – plus some other supplements like fish oil, Vitamin D3, magnesium and calcium (I was functionally deficient in calcium). Good luck on your trying to conceive journey!

      Reply

      1. Ashley

        Thank you Andrea! Also, once pregnant, do you stay on your supplements? I am taking Thorne’s metylguard as well as permaclear.

        Reply

        1. Andrea Post author

          Yes, you will definitely want to stay on your supplements when pregnant. I recommend finding a knowledgeable practitioner who can monitor and advise on what you should be taking. It’s important to treat the individual, not the SNP.

          Just a note: our person-specific health discussions have moved to the new forums. For fastest response in the future, please post health questions there. =)

          Reply

  71. Dawn @ PricklyMom

    Andrea, I love your blog. It has been such a help since I discovered my “status” (homozygous C677T). I consult your blog as much as I consult the Dr. Ben site. 🙂

    I had two successful pregnancies, but looking back, there were so many red flags: the high blood pressure, being sick the whole time from those crazy folic acid-laden vitamins, the pre-eclampsia worries the whole time. You know what the icing on the cake is? The maternal-fetal medicine department of our local health care system has recently stopped testing for MTHFR because they decided it’s not important (my primary care doc is friends with a doc there). Ay yi yi!

    Keep up the good work, and I hope you’ll be welcoming a little one into your family someday soon.

    Reply

    1. Andrea Post author

      Dawn, thank you so much for your comment and support! I’m so glad that my writing and research has helped you =)

      It’s so interesting (also sad) about the MFM you mentioned but I believe it! My MFM is taking my MTHFR seriously, but I went in to see him armed with knowledge and studies. He did, however, show me a recent (Sept 2013) medical journal stating that testing everyone for MTHFR was not recommended; that MTHFR wasn’t an issue for pregnancy…or something along those lines. He wasn’t trying to refute what I was saying, but wanted me to see what the literature was telling the doctors. Unreal!!

      Reply

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